#JanuaryJoy: Make something with your hands

I’ll ‘fess up now and admit, this isn’t the ‘Make something with your hands’ prompt I had planned to share but what d’ya know, January has whizzed by and instead of feeling it has passed me by, I’m happy to say I’ve enjoyed all of it with Bea. 🙂

This is however something I have been planning to do for ages. I’m a huge scented candle fan and often buy them or am lucky enough to receive them as presents. What always bugs me though is that last centimeter or so at the end when the wick runs out of lovely scented wax. I’d always wanted to do something with it and now I finally have. I melted down each of them and layered the wax with a fresh wick and made ⅔ of a new candle with the leftovers from just 4 other candles that would otherwise have been binned!

So, you’ll need:

  • An assortment of old candles (scented or otherwise)
  • Some new wicks (I bought 20 from Amazon – 10 Pre Waxed Wicks For Candle Making)
  • A clean, dry container for your recycled candle
  • A medium sized saucepan and a small plastic pot
  1. Use a knife or something sharp to scrape the candle ends out of the pots
  2. If you are using scented candles then you will have to melt the wax individually and layer the scents, but if it’s just old wax, then you can melt the whole lot together. This is similar to melting chocolate for cooking, so just bring a pan of water to a simmer and float your plastic pot with the old wax in it on the water until it all melts. Keep an eye on it, it’s usually quite quick, and you don’t want the pan to boil dry and melt your pot to the pan! 😉 The wax will melt clear and you’ll see the old wick floating around. Remove the wax from the heat and fish out the old wick carefully – it will be hot!
  3. Centre your NEW wick in the clean and ready container for your new candle – you might want to balance it against something (like this knife in the photo) to keep it centred, which is important otherwise your wax will melt unevenly as it burns. Then pour in your wax and allow to cool.
  4. Repeat the process for each separate candle and scent, allowing to cool between each layer.
  5. Finally trim your wick to about 1cm long then light and enjoy!

Of course you can also clean up the empty glasses and containers that the other candles were in (I just use hot soapy water after melting the excess and wiping them out with kitchen roll,) and use them as vases or pots around the house for pencils or make-up brushes. If you’ve got any you really love you could even buy some wax chips online and make new candles so you can keep enjoying the decorative pot.

Did you ever make candles when you were younger? I had loads of DIY craft kits for candle making – it was fun to do it again in a grown up way!

Have you made anything this January?

Love,
Rebecca
xo

A DIY: Modern China

This afternoon, unusually for Florence Finds, we’ll be getting our craft on with this DIY project sent in by Anna from Angel in the North.

It’s fair to say that shabby chic and vintage china isn’t usually my style but I instantly fell in love with the modern take on these charity shop finds and the bold type Anna used for the lettering. I think they lend a really quirky touch to the trend and I can see them anywhere in the home, maybe even a child’s bedroom with a name stencilled on instead?

Over to you Anna!

What you need:

  • China plates in a style of your choice. (Mine were £1.50 for three in a local charity shop. The number you need and size will depend on the text you want to use. Mine were 16cms in diameter which meant the letters were 7cm high).

  • Sharpie permanent marker in black, fine point
  • Ballpoint pen
  • Ruler
  • Scissors and craft knife

1. Create a stencil for your letters by printing your text onto thick paper or card and cutting it out. The font I used was Bodoni MT in 400 point.
2. Position your stencil in the right place on your plate and draw round it using a ballpoint pen.

3. Go over the line with the Sharpie (it helps to use a ruler for the straight edges) and fill in. Let the first coat dry overnight, then you might want to do a second coat to get a dense, even finish.

So, do you like readers? I think it’s a seriously clever idea and I love that it’s so easy yet so effective.

As ever, if you’ve got a home DIY, whether it’s a revamped and painted chair, a window treatment or anything else you think is worth sharing, I’d love to hear from you – send them in marked SUBMISSION to hello@florencefinds.com

Thanks Anna!

Love,
Rebecca
xo

Florence’s Florals: A DIY Easter tree

Yay! Just half a working day before the long Bank Holiday weekend and I hope you all gain some inspiration for easter decor and general floral loveliness from todays post by Becky Hay from Blossom

Hello Findettes, I hope this DIY post will bring a Bank Holiday weekend full of sunshine your way. Last month I mentioned that spring in the shop heralds the arrival of the Easter window. It’s one of my favourite displays of the year. A tree of branches decorated with colourful eggs, rabbits and chicks.

I can’t remember how old I was when my Mum first brought home the box of tiny carved wooden decorations to hang, but it has become as much a family tradition as the Christmas tree and I now uphold the tradition in my own home.

I’m not religious, more of a ‘Mother Nature’ kind of girl which is why I think the pagan tradition of the Easter tree appeals so much. The trees originate from Europe, most likely Sweden, where they are often decorated with feathers and eggs. Although decorations are widely available in the UK now, look out for the more unusual and intricate ones if you’re on holiday in Europe. I purchased the white eggs in the DIY photos below in Prague one November.

The two DIY’s I’ve created for you are, as always, to inspire you. There are no rules, just make what you fancy out of whatever you can find easily to hand. I’ve included some additional Easter tree images to give you even more food for thought as well.

DIY 1 – The Anything Goes Tree
What you’ll need:

  • A vase/ jug/ urn/ pot – choose something with a wide neck if you want to fill it with lots of flowers as well as the twigs.
  • Twigs – I used white Blossom in bud
  • A selection of mixed Spring flowers – I used Hyacinths, Narcissi, Tulips and Roses
  • A small piece of florist’s foam – soaked.
  • Decorations to hang

What to do:

  1. Wedge the florist’s foam into the base of your container before filling it with water.
  2. Arrange the twigs in the centre of the container using the florist’s foam to secure them.
  3. Take your largest flower, in my case, the hyacinths, and arrange them amongst the twigs.
  4. Next I placed the narcissi through the twigs and other flowers, cutting them at very different lengths. Florist’s tip – pick off the dried papery protective hoods from narcissi or daffodils before displaying them. Your design will be a little more polished.
  5. I cut my roses short and used them at the very neck of the container and finally added the tulips. Tulips continue to grow even after they’ve been cut so use them to flow through your arrangement. You can support their heads with the twigs.
  6. Once you’ve placed all of your flowers, make sure your container is topped up with water and have fun hanging your decorations.
  7. Keep the water level topped up and remove individual flowers as they wilt.

DIY 2 – The Simple Option
What you’ll need:

  • A vase or Jug
  • Twigs of your choice – I used contorted Hazel twigs which don’t need water and can be stored away and re-used next year.
  • Real eggs
  • Thin ribbon or very fine string
  • I used the small headed Narcissi Soleil d’Or but regular Daffodils will have a similar effect

What to do:
Firstly, I hold my hand up and admit that I didn’t make the hanging egg vases. I cheated and bought them. That’s not to say that you can’t make them yourselves with a little patience and a gentle touch!

  1. To make the vases you will need to gently take the top off your eggs, empty the contents out (I suggest into a mixing bowl, ready to be baked into a delicious cake) before rinsing the shell out. The tricky bit will be piercing the holes in the sides of the egg to thread a thin piece of string or ribbon to create your handle. I suggest using a pin and a cork to press onto.
  2. Alternatively, if you’re a boiled egg fan, just save the shells once you’ve enjoyed your breakfast!
  3. Hang your eggs and fill each of them with a little water.
  4. Cut your narcissi very short and place them into your egg vases.

I hope that you all have a wonderful Easter break and that this will inspire you to bring some Easter cheer into the house. Do let me know if you’ll be creating an Easter tree this year.

A display that cheerful can’t fail to warm your heart and home for Easter – I’m inspired to go and make something beautiful for my easter table now.

As always, Becky is around if you need to ask any questions, fire away and let us know if you’ve been inspired by her Easter tree.

Love,
Rebecca
xo

Spotted: Illamasqua

Today I’m sharing with you what is not only a red hot and smokin’ eye look, but an incredibly worthwhile cause.

You may remember the tragic assault that Sophie Lancaster suffered in 2007 from seeing it on the news – Sadly, for no other reason than that her assailants ‘didn’t like the look of her’, Sophie was kicked to death because she looked different. The Sophie Lancaster Foundation is now dedicated in her name to Stamping Out Predjudice Hatred and Intolerance Everywhere (S.O.P.H.I.E.)

But why am I telling you this? Well, a reader of Florence Finds correctly assumed that I would be interested in the collaboration between The Sophie Lancaster Foundation and Illamasqua, the cult make-up brand that is known for it’s unapologetic style. Illamasqua is not afraid to be different.

In honour of Sophie and their collaboration with The Sophie Lancaster Foundation, Illamasqua have created the Sophie Eye. An outrageously sexy and defiant look that I just had to share today.

Not only is it completely gorgeous, I know there are lots of you out there who really struggle with the smokey eye look. The S.O.P.H.I.E. pencil is just £13 and created especially to help you easily recreate the look at home. And £3 from every sale goes straight to The Sophie Lancaster Foundation.

If you head on over to the Illamasqua site, there’s a whole world of slightly subversive and unique make up perfect for making a statement. There’s also a brilliant video showing you how to create the S.O.P.H.I.E. I at home.

I really wanted to get this look demonstrated on me, just to show you all that it can work on real women like you but sadly ran out of time. Instead, do let me know if it’s a look you aspire to creating or in fact if you already know Illamasqua and their fabulous products.

Has there ever been a better excuse to buy make up?

Love,
Rebecca
xo

Florence’s DIY Mani-tips

Hello lovelies!

This afternoon it’s a ‘beating the January blues’ kinda post, because what can possibly cheer you up more than a slick of colour on your nails?

You may be a regular getting your nails done, or have never ever had them done, either way, there’s always a time when you might need to paint them. For a special night out perhaps, or maybe you’re a regular polish addict and want to save some pennies by DIY-ing at home sometimes. For anybody who needs it, this is my DIY guide to painting your nails with success and the top products that I use each and every time to make it last.

The Products:
I am a firm believer in painting your nails properly. That means using a base coat and a top coat and I have 2 great recommendations for you.

Leighton Denny Base coat

First up. Leighton Denny Base Coat. This dries matte and I have no idea how it makes the colour cling on so well to your nail, but I couldn’t be without it. It’s quick drying too so needn’t add any time to your routine. It’s a little more than your average nail polish in terms of price but I’ve had mine for 3 years and it’s still going strong.

For a top coat, it’s the cheap and cheerful Rimmel Pro Super Wear Top Coat. This has 2 great actions – firstly it really makes a difference when it comes to chips and making the polish last, but it also gives a wicked shine to any colour. (Please note, this polish is clear, but mine has taken on the colour of the polishes I layer it over, most notably Rouge Noir.) 😉

On the left here, you’ll see my Leighton Denny Miracle Drops. These are a must for people who smudge out of impatience. You drop them onto the nail as soon as you’re done with your top coat and the chemicals suck the oxygen out of the polish making it dry quicker. You can apply several times if you’re in a hurry and it really works.

Bodyshop Almond oil nail and cuticle treatment

You will also see I have photographed a cuticle oil that I use occasionally. It’s cheap and moisturises the nails well -I used one before my wedding and dip in occasionally now, worth a try if you struggle with yours being dry or scraggy.

The How-To:
First up, start with clean, filed nails. I use the Leighton Denny Crystal Nail File and prefer mine short and square-ish. I bought the mini file (£12) over a year ago and it’s supposed to have a lifetime guarantee. It’s also make light work of the job – I hate filing my nails, surely we all have better things to do with our time?

Apply your base coat first coating the whole nail from the cuticle up and right to both edges.

Once that has dried, start applying your colour. The trick to looking like your nails were done professionally is all in the base of the nail. Try to make a straight line with a millimetre or two’s gap from the cuticle. I like to press the brush onto my finger half way up the nail then edge it down to create this line, before swiping it along the length of the nail. I do each nail in 2 quick strokes. Be decisive! It’s when you stress over getting it straight that you wobble! Like the base of the nail, don’t paint right to the edge of the nail either, it helps avoid mistakes and elongates the nail if yours are short.

If you’re messy (and it happens to everyone) just use the nail of the other hand to scrap it off, or wrap a bit of tissue tightly around a cocktail stick and wipe away – you can also do this at the end to tidy up if you dip it in a bit of nail polish remover.

How to paint nails

I applied 2 coats of this fab metallic white gold colour from Topshop – it’s like molten metal on and I’d recommend it for this time of year – it’s bright enough to look cheerful for spring, but also wintery with it’s glitzy edge. 🙂

Next apply your top coat. The Rimmel one has an extra wide brush so you should be able to do the whole nail in one coat, try to take it a tiny bit wider than the actual colour and slightly lower, to really seal in the edges.

Finish with the Miracle Drops and Voila!

(I took this photo less than 2 minutes after applying the miracle drops and you can see they are touch dry already. They wouldn’t take a big knock or swipe but the drops are incredibly good.)

Let me know if you like DIY-ing and found this useful or of course if you have any recommendations for products to try that make a DIY manicure easier.

Lots of fancy-fingered love,
Rebecca
xo

Florence’s Florals: A DIY Christmas Berry Wreath

Good afternoon readers!

This afternoon we have part 2 of Florence’s Festive Florals with Becky from Blossom. It’s the second of her 2 wreath tutorials, this one is still rustic but more traditional and includes living elements, hence us deciding to post it closer to Christmas – it will last through the holidays if made this weekend. Enjoy!

Hello again, and welcome to version 2 of the festive wreath tutorial. If you haven’t already seen the rustic winter owl wreath, pop over and have a look, as the principles for making them both are identical. I’ve used fresh materials in this version which will look good for a couple of weeks if you keep it somewhere cool. Please don’t be put off by the amount of text below, once you’ve mastered how to wire each piece, it really is very easy. And once again, please remember that there is no right or wrong addition to a wreath. You can add as little or as much as you want, of whatever takes your fancy.

What I used:

  • Large ready made willow wreath
  • Fresh ivy trails
  • 2 x stems Ilex verticillata ‘Winter Gold’ – this is also available in bright red from all good florists
  • 8 x natural pine cones
  • 3 x whole dried oranges
  • 6 – 9 x dried orange slices
  • 9 x cinnamon sticks
  • Natural raffia
  • Medium – thick gauge florist stub wires

What to do:
1. Wrap pieces of trailing ivy around and through the wreath. Secure it by tucking into the gaps in the wreath frame.

2. Wire each item that you want to attach to your wreath. You may find it easier to wire everything first and attach the pieces to the wreath afterwards.

  • To wire the Ilex: Cut each piece of Ilex down to approximately 2 cm below the lowest branch of berries. Fold a piece of wire in half to form a hair pin shape and hold it against the base of the piece of Ilex. Wrap one half of the wire around the base of the stem and the other end of the wire to secure.
  • To wire the pine cones & whole oranges: Take a single piece of stub wire and dig the middle part of the wire in between the scales at the base of the cone (the fatter end), pull each end of the wire down, and twist them together as close to the bottom of the cone as possible. Pull each end of the wire back together and straighten. In floristry terms this is called a ‘double leg mount’ – the two stems of the wire are known as ‘legs’.

Use the same principle to wire the whole dried oranges, piercing the base of the fruit with the wire.

  • To wire the orange slices: Group 2 or 3 dried orange slices together, overlapping them so that you can see the segments of each slice. Pierce through both of the slices at the base, pull each end of the wire down and twist the wires together to secure the slices.
  • To wire the cinnamon: Make 3 bundles of cinnamon sticks by wrapping a wire around the middle of 3 sticks and twisting the wires together. Don’t worry if the wire feels quite loose, you can secure the cinnamon by using a piece of raffia to wrap over and around the wire. It not only secures the bundle, it also hides the wire in your display. Tie the raffia in a bow or knot on the top of the bundle (the opposite side to the twisted wire).

3. You can now attach each individual piece to your wreath by pushing the wires through the gaps in the wreath and twisting them together at the back of the wreath to secure. Tuck the excess ends of wire back into the back of the wreath so they don’t scratch your front door.

4. Tie a big bow using the raffia and pierce through the back of the bow with a wire. With the bow at the centre of the wire, pull the two ends of wire together and twist together. Use the wire legs to attach the bow to your wreath in the same way you’ve attached everything else.

5. If you need to create a hook to hang your wreath from, you can use a piece of raffia or a piece of wire.

I’ll be on hand later to answer any questions. Just leave a comment below 🙂

Thank you Becky!

Did you have a go at last week’s wreath, or will you be attempting this one – perhaps this is more up your ‘Christmas Street’?

Do leave a comment if you love it, or if you have any questions as Becky said – Becky will be back in the New Year with more Florence’s Florals!

Love,
Rebecca
xo

DIY MakeUp – The Lady is a Vamp

This morning we’ve got another DIY tutorial for you and it’s just a little bit bold… I really wanted to try this as part of the looks we shot for the DIY tutorials, I really fell in love with the vampy looks I saw in the September issues and strong lips have been slowly creeping in for a couple of seasons now. The tricky bit is just how does the average girl pull it off? I think there’s no mistaking that this is a party look, so that’s how we staged it and it’s also one that perhaps darker skins are going to be more suited to wearing, therefore I hope you’ll welcome the lovely Mahj who leant us her fabulous pout for this look 🙂


Image Credit: Zoe Hodson. Makeup, Catherine from Ivy Clara Makeup.

Catherine from Ivy Clara, the makeup artist who glammed Mahj up, is going to talk us through how to create this look – take it away Catherine!

This year, dark lips featured a lot in the A/W collections of a number of design houses. Some of my favourite looks belonged to Gucci, Givenchy and Holly Fulton where dark, glossy lips were the ‘black’ cherry on the cake. I loved this look and stared in awe at the gothic-esque models with their pale skin and vampy look, but even as a makeup artist, have been a bit scared to try and pull this off on my own pout. I should not have doubted this gorgeous winter look. In my opinion it’s all about less is more. By that I mean a dark lip looks classy, but on an average girl like myself, to team it with a dark gothic eye as seen on the Givenchy catwalk, would definitely be too much. Being brave with makeup is more to do with being clever with makeup. Look in Vogue for ideas of course, (I am addicted to the magazine) but don’t assume that the looks you see can’t be transferred from the catwalk to the sidewalk! Think, ‘Maybe I could wear a bright pink lip but leave the orange eyeshaow out’ or as in the case today ‘Maybe I could actually wear a dark lip, but with a little warmth to the skin and a neutral eye…’ Here goes ladies. The makeup for Holly Fulton’s collection, in my opinion, was one of the most wearable, and inspired me for Mahj’s look.

For this look, I created a matte, flawless base, lightly bronzed. Eyes were highlighted with gold to create a really ‘expensive’ finish. The black element was added to the eyes only by lashings of jet black mascara and lips were a sumptuous glossy shade resembling black cherries.

1. Create a flawless base by applying a medium coverage foundation strating at the centre of the face and blending outwards. Skin coverage is needed mostly in the centre of the face so this method ensures that skin is not over loaded with product. Next, apply a concealer such as Laura Mercier’s ‘Secret Camouflage’ under the eyes and pat with your ring finger (the finger with the lightest touch,) or lightly buff with a fluffy brush like the Mac 224. Mahj’s facial skin is flawless and creamy in colour which worked well with this ‘vampesque’ look. A subtle ‘warmth’ was added by sweeping bronzer lightly across the forehead, bridge of the nose, cheekbones and chin. I used Daniel Sandler’s Mineral Bronzing Powder. This helps to soften a winter complexion.


Image Credit: Zoe Hodson. Makeup, Catherine from Ivy Clara Makeup.

2. For the eyes I began by sweeping a light gold irredescent eyeshadow all over the lid and ended just above the socket line. I took this colour right into the corner of the eyes to highlight them. I used L’Oreal La Couleur Infallible Eyeshadow in ‘Goldmine’.

3. To create socket definition, I then applied a rich bronze to the outer socket line and buffed this into the gold base underneath. For this, I used Illamasqua Pure Pigment in ‘Rich Russet Bronze’.


Image Credit: Zoe Hodson. Makeup, Catherine from Ivy Clara Makeup.

4. I then added a soft brown line along the upper and lower lash line with Mac’s ‘Espresso’ Matte Eyeshadow to create definition. This finish created a look a lot less harsh than a black eyeliner would have.

5. I then lightly combed through Mahj’s eyeborows with Mac’s Brow Set in ‘Beguile’ to create a groomed look without being too harsh.

6. Next I tackled the lips. I didn’t use a lip pencil as I wanted to ensure the line created was the same colour as the lipstick. These days, a good lipstick does not ‘bleed’ and their formulations lend themselves to being used in this way. It also saves you having to buy a lip liner in various different colours – especially if you are only experimenting! I used a fine lip brush with short strokes until I had taken the line around the entire lips. You can then go over again until you are happy with the lip shape. Don’t attempt to draw a solid line without stopping, this will more often than not look wonky! The product I chose to use was ‘Rouge Interdit – Lune Carmin Lipstick No 52’ by Givenchy.


Image Credit: Zoe Hodson. Makeup, Catherine from Ivy Clara Makeup.

7. At this point I should add that even makeup artists can make the odd mistake, especially with such pigmented colour! Clean up any mistakes with your concealer brush and a spot of concealer. Next fill the lips in with the same colour and blot before re-applying.

8. This could be the last step for the lips but I really wanted Mahj to have a glossy lip to create even more glamour. I added a thin layer of gloss in a similar colour over the entire lips. To create this I used a gloss by the same Givenchy range which compliments the base colour, ‘Gloss Interdit – Lune Carmin Lip Gloss No 31’.


Image Credit: Zoe Hodson. Makeup, Catherine from Ivy Clara Makeup.

9. To finish the look I added lashings of black mascara, tipping my hat to Givenchy but avoiding a run in with Dracula.

I think this is such a strong look, but it’s also a grown up one. I love seeing women who aren’t afraid to play with makeup and are no longer wearing it so everyone thinks they look ‘pretty’ – men included, but because they love it. This is what this look is about for me. I’ll be wearing it come the festive season with loose curls and sparkles 🙂 Thank you so much Mahj, Zoe Hodson and Catherine for showing us how it’s done!

I’d love to hear what you think of this look – is it something you do or don’t like, or have we made you consider trying something new?

Love,
Rebecca
xo

PS. I have posted this in the comments below, but as a few of you have been asking for advice on shades for paler skins here is a twit pic of me wearing the same look. Catherine will pop by later to give advice on other shades too. xo

DIY MakeUp – 70’s Caramels

Afternoon!

Apologies for the lack of variation today! Not only did this turn into a mammoth post, but there has been some difficulty behind the scenes for the last 2 days and while I’m working with the hosting company to get things sorted, this was the easiest way of making sure you all got your twice daily fix 🙂

Ok, so we’re back to share the actual how-to for the gorgeous look Laura was sporting in this morning’s post. This tutorial is based around the caramel and bronze look made famous by Farrah Fawcett in the 1970’s. Let’s get going with Catherine’s step by step how-to…

1. To create a matte yet natural base begin by applying a natural semi matte foundation to the face. Start at the t-zone with the product and blend outwards towards the hair and jaw line. Use the foundation brush to then sweep over the eyelids to eye to even the colour of the lids and act as a primer for eye shadow.

2. Next, to brighten the under eye area, apply a light reflective concealer such as Yves Saint Lauren Touche Eclat using a fluffy brush to buff into the delicate skin. Using this form of application will prevent the product lying in any fine lines.

3 & 4. Use a natural bronzer and apply to the skin where the sun would hit you naturally, the top of the forehead, bridge of nose, top of cheeks and chin. Close your eyes and sweep the brush over the eye lids to enhance the sunkissed look. Daniel Sandler’s bronzer is one of my farourites as it is has a natural finish and is not orange in the slightest. It also has two shades which I find fantastic for contouring the skin. Apply the bronzer in light, sweeping motions with a large fluffy brush.

5. Next, apply a light shimmery eyeshadow such as ‘Naked Lunch’ by Mac to the whole lid. Patting the eyeshadow as opposed to sweeping will give it longer staying power.
6. Apply a metallic bronze colour, such as ‘Woodwinked’ by Mac, into the socket line and buff any harsh lines using a fluffy brush like the Mac 224.
7 & 8. Fill in the brows using a matte eyeshadow. I reccomend buying a light brown and dark brown shadow which you can then mix to create the perfect colour and intensity for you. Use a slanted brush and light upward strokes for a natural finish.

9 & 10. To add a healthy flush of colour to the face, lightly apply a peachy toned blusher onto the fleshy part of your cheeks. I used Laura Mercier Second Skin Cheek Colour in ‘Lush Nectarine’. It helps to smile while you do this!
11. Next, apply coating of black mascara, but keep the look light and clump free. I love L’Oreal ‘Million Lashes’ mascara as the brush has fine teeth to create a totally clump free finish.
12. To finish the look apply a shimmery nude gloss to the lips which will keep the look natural while adding fullness. I particulary love Laura Mercier Lip Glacé in ‘Bare Peach’.

And here’s the finished result… Catherine very deftly added some ‘Farrah Flicks’ to complement the makeup and even if I do say so myself, I’m loving this look, particularly on Laura. Even Harry the Guinea Pig couldn’t help himself getting in on the act… his coat was too good a colour match to resist. 😉

With Thanks to:
Catherine, (Ivy Clara makeup) – go check out her work if you’re in need of a make-up artist for anything from make-up lesson parties to events or of course bridal – she’s a star.
Photography – Zoe Hodson
my friend Laura,
…and of course, Harry the Guinea Pig for guest starring!

Drop us all a comment in the box below if you’ll be trying the 70’s caramel look, or if you’re already a fan…

Love,
Rebecca.
xo

PS Look out for more make-up tutorials coming in future – and if there’s something you would like to recreate, then please drop me a line on hello@florencefinds.com and I’ll see what my superstar team can do!

PPS. No animals were harmed in the making of this tutorial. 😉

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