What I have learned about Weddings: 5 years on

This Saturday is Pete and I’s fifth wedding anniversary. How did that even happen? As it’s somewhat of a milestone and I don’t talk about weddings on here very often, I thought it would be a nice time to do a little series on wedding reflections with that 5 year perspective. I also know that many of you know me via my wedding blogging background and shared the journey with me, getting married around the same time and in the couple of years after my wedding, so I’m sure you must have something to say on the subjects I’m going to cover too – I’ll be looking forward to reading your thoughts! I’m also away this week (at a wedding!) so it will be a ‘weddings only’ special week with reduced posts.

Firstly, I thought I would write a post about my perspective on the wedding now. It goes without saying that my tastes have changed and of course, I would probably change everything looking back if we were to get in to the detail. I guess some people would say that they wouldn’t change a thing and I get the sentimental aspect of that, but I tend to be the kind of person who changes as life changes, plus I don’t feel attached to my wedding ‘day’, but the resulting marriage.

The last couple of years has also seen some of our best friends get married and so I’ve been heavily involved in weddings all over again, after a break from wedding blogging. Having that outside/inside perspective and the benefit of hindsight is interesting and has made me think about the stress and money involved, so I thought I’d share my thoughts.


Image Via SMP

1. Less formality.
You know how Carrie and Big’s guest list in the SATC movie suddenly jumps to 200 and when she tries to explain it to Big she compares the wedding to a poker match, saying ‘The dress upped the ante.’ Well that kind of happened with our wedding. My dress was probably one of the first things I found, (totally wrong order,) and ended up commanding a grander venue when an informal garden wedding was something I had always wanted. Of course there were loads of other factors that dictated the wedding, like Pete’s specification that it be held in a church, our lack of venue to hold a ‘garden wedding’ and my fears about the weather. In actual fact we had the hottest day of the year and everyone I know who has planned outdoor parts of their wedding since has been lucky and the weather held up. We have always said since the day we got married that we should have done it at our rehearsal dinner – a garden BBQ we had the night before with just our immediate family and bridal party.

2. Less people
We had a guest list of 88 and I think around that number give or take a few attended. I remember overwhelmingly feeling that there were people there that we didn’t need there and afterwards realising there were still people we hadn’t managed to speak to.

3. Less nik knacks and stress
Don’t get me wrong, I still love a creative wedding and I really admire people who put masses of effort into their day, but it totally stressed me out and with the benefit of hindsight, it wasn’t necessary. People don’t notice (other than fleetingly,) and I’d concentrate on a great venue with good bones and overdose on the flowers, forgetting much else if I did it again. All of the extra details just contributed to stress and observing other peoples weddings has reinforced the fact that the more detail there is, the more stress there is for everyone involved.


Image via SMP

4. A comfortable dress!
It’s easy to say, having worn a princess dress once already, but I would choose something much softer and less intrusive on everyone else if I did it again. My dress wasn’t heavy (light as a feather) and it wasn’t uncomfortably tight, but it got in the way of just being around people and hugging and dancing with Pete and it’s not really me to wear something that restricts me doing everything I want to.

5. Party!
Lastly, I would make the wedding much more of a party and less of a sequence of events. (drinks reception, dinner, speeches, dancing.) Casual, relaxed, FUN!

I suppose I should temper this with things I wouldn’t change or am glad that we did do as this sounds negative and I’m certainly not sat here worrying about it 5 years later!


Image credit: Lawson Photography

1. Photography
I’m so glad we spent money on Photography. Admittedly it seemed like a huge chunk of our budget then, (it was probably about 10% relatively speaking) and decent photography is even more expensive now, but I don’t think it could ever be something you regret.

2. Fake cake
Our cake was made by a friend at the time who was a pro-cake maker. It was a gift and saved us a fortune, but looking back, I certainly wouldn’t spend money on one again in the future. Ours was four tiers and would have been so much bigger than required so the top three tiers were ‘fake’ polystyrene but you never would have known.


Image credit: Lawson Photography

3. The Ceremony
I wouldn’t change a single thing about our ceremony – every bit of effort that I put into it was worthwhile and the whole thing was perfect – it remains my best memory of the day, as it should be!

4. The feast
After having quite a few bad generic wedding chicken dinners, I am so glad we spent money on the food, (we held our wedding at a restaurant and as a result the food was incredible – a four course italian menu with antipasti, a pasta course, a fish/meat course and tiramisu for dessert!) People still say how great it was now and given how much I like my food it was a worthwhile expense! We also scheduled a longer than usual (even given the fact that we had photos close to the venue and weren’t away from the guests for long,) drinks reception – it’s often my favourite bit of the day at a wedding and over before it has begun.

5. Having it close to OUR home.
Looking back, I’m so glad we had our wedding in Manchester. It meant all of our suppliers were local to where we lived, which reduced the planning stress, and the majority of our guests didn’t have to fork out for accommodation or travel. The few that did had access to the whole range of accommodation options to suit their budget and the venue was walkable from the church.


Image Via

6. Time with family
The other precious moments that I cherish the most from our wedding are spending it with the people I loved the most – I don’t mean our extended guest list when I say that, but the rehearsal dinner the night before and the morning I spent getting ready with my mum and bridesmaids. That was such a relaxed and fun time and felt really special.

7. Flowers
I love flowers and still do, so although we spent a huge amount on flowers I would do it again in a heart beat. In fact I’d have even more!

8. Get a planner
I also asked Pete what he would change and we were pretty much on the same page; ‘Smaller, more casual and less formal,’ were his words and he also reminded me that we always said if we were to do it again we would get a planner. I think wedding planners are so under rated and always considered a luxury. Whilst it’s certainly not cheap, an affordable cost is to get an ‘on the day’ planner, or someone to support you around the last week of build up and expense wise, I’d say they are worth their weight in gold.

So readers, with the benefit of married hindsight, what would you do differently looking back on your wedding, and what are you glad you spent the time, money and effort on?

Love,
Rebecca
xo

PS Later in the week I’ll be talking marriage and sharing some pics of my own wedding :) I hope you enjoy reminiscing over it all!

Red Carpet Manicure…

Confession time. I have never had acrylic nails or a gel manicure. Partly because I used to be scared that it might damage my nails and partly because I don’t lied the really thick look of acrylics. Gel manicures however I love, I just haven’t taken the plunge because I’m lucky and have strong nails that polish seems to last one. However, I know that for many people with weak or brittle nails, or perhaps if you use your nails and hands a lot for work, gel manicures are a godsend. So when Laura Lawson told me about her new home kit for DIY gel manicures, I asked her to share her thoughts – it’s a perfect present for Santa to put under the Christmas tree :)

Since my first gel manicure at the start of the year, I was hooked. I was so used to having to re-do chipped nails every few days, that the idea that they could look perfect and super shiny for a few weeks blew my mind!


Image credit: Lawson Photography

The process isn’t miles away from a regular manicure, the nails are painted – base coat, 2 coats of colour and a top coat – but in between each coat the gel is cured under a UV light rather than air drying. This means when it’s finished, it’s totally dry and you don’t have to walk around like a crazy woman trying not to touch anything (which unfortunately means there’s no excuse not to wash up!).


Image credit: Lawson Photography

Removing them is a bit of a fiddle; they’re buffed, covered in a blob of cotton wool soaked in nail varnish remover, and each finger/thumb wrapped in foil for ten minutes. Then they pretty much slide off with an orange stick. I was a bit worried that my natural nails underneath would be ruined (like when you have acrylics), but I’ve found that as long as you soak them for long enough before removing so you’re not peeling them off, and use plenty of cuticle oil generally, your natural nails stay healthy and happy.


Image credit: Lawson Photography

Now for the negative – they’re so EXPENSIVE! I knew I couldn’t get away with spending £50 every three weeks on pretty hands, this would have to be ‘special occasions only’. Then I heard about Red Carpet Manicure. DIY gel manicure kits, complete with all you need (including the light to cure it) and lots of lovely colours of LED polish. For the price of a couple of professional manicures, I could get a kit and do my own – it was worth a try!


Image credit: Lawson Photography

I LOVE it! I got the professional LED kit, which includes: professional LED light, a pre & post application cleanser, a sanitizer, base coat gel, top coat gel, nail polish remover, nourishing cuticle oil, and a lovely classic bright red polish (Red Carpet Reddy). There’s lots of goodies on the Red Carpet Manicure website – gems and jewels kit, French manicure kit, and a big range of nail colours. I’ve been adding to my collection, my latest favourite is ‘Draped in rubies’, a gorgeous deep red with sparkles reminiscent of Dorothy’s shoes, very festive!


Image credit: Lawson Photography

Once you’ve mastered the hands, you have to give it a try on your feet; it lasts forever! :-)

XXX

Florence’s Manchester Afternoon Tea

Last weekend was the Florence Finds afternoon tea in Manchester and what an afternoon it was. Despite some people feeling distinctly worse for the wear from the Saturday night before I was beyond honoured that people hauled themselves out of bed to support me and Florence Finds – thanks guys :)



Bottom Image: Top right, Laura Lawson. Bottom, Myself and Mahj.
All Images by Laura and Peter Lawson of Lawson Photography

It’s ironic that one of the things I fear the most about the blog, its diversity, is actually the thing that marks it out for readers as different, and also acts as a benchmark for the readers. I sat amongst Doctors, Florists, Photographers, stay at home Mums and a dairy farmer for good measure! Readers journeyed from as close as Didsbury, to as far afield as Shropshire, Halifax and Nottingham – I was blown away.


Top, Ruth. Middle, Laura and Vicky of Bride and Chic. Bottom, Elissa from Magpie Miller.
All Images by Laura and Peter Lawson of Lawson Photography

Topics covered included maternity benefits, how to change a tap washer or fix a toilet, house prices and of course nail polish, with everything in-between. I love you guys for being so intelli-fabulous.


Vicky and Fran (top), Zan, Mahj, Me and Becky Hay from Blossom (bottom).

Laura and Peter Lawson.
All Images by Laura and Peter Lawson of Lawson Photography

Laura and Peter Lawson were roped in to bring their cameras along so I owe them a massive thank you for tirelessly snapping and capturing it all for me to share with you. We held the tea at the Great John Street Hotel, part of the Eclectic Hotel group and one of my favourite places in the city. not only was the decor fabulous, but the afternoon tea was delicious and the service brilliantly organised – I can’t wait to organise the next one with them. If you’re ever in Manchester and want to treat yourself to staying somewhere nice, definitely check them out. The rooms are seriously decadent.


Elissa, Mahj and Becky.
All Images by Laura and Peter Lawson of Lawson Photography

Thank you so much to everyone for coming and a big shout out to Jillian who missed her train from Edinburgh. Roll on the next round of teas… I just need a little break to recover first!

Love,
Rebecca
xo

PS have a look in the gallery below for more images – Thanks Laura and Pete again!

A [Bloggers] Guide to Camera Conundrums, by Laura Lawson

Recently I have been getting more and more frustrated. Like a lot of bloggers I suspect, I have a huge interest in photography. I also have a little knowledge, having been taught by my Dad how to use his fancy Canon SLR before I even hit my teens. A combination of the passage of time and little time to practice means that put my beautiful Canon 40D into my mitts and I cannot get it to behave.

Not only do I want my photography to get better but I want great images for the blog, and as it’s me who produces those images, in the main, I need to get learning fast. However, the ‘T’ word gets in the way again… time. As I’m sure you can imagine, I’m not exactly swimming in the stuff. Things have gotten so bad recently that I have even thought of selling my camera and over the weekend I abandoned it all together in favour of our old Canon Coolpix then was hugely disappointed at it’s lack of function while we were in London. (Don’t even get me started on the fact that I can’t seem to get the images off the darn thing right now.) One of my biggest issues is that I need my camera to be be a little bit more compact and portable than the huge DSLR that is the D40. I always need it in my bag, literally everywhere and so when Laura Lawson offered to write a bit about cameras and how to use them, I knew my blogging readers and perhaps those of you interested in photography would love to hear her tips. It doesn’t hurt that she’s not only a brilliant photographer but a funny girl, and if you’re coming to the Florence Finds Afternoon Tea in Manchester you can meet her (and her equally talented husband Pete) too!

Thanks Laura – you’re a star. :)

WHAT THE HECK IS ISO AND WHY ARE ALL MY PICTURES WHITE?
- A guide to camera conundrums by Laura Lawson.

I have a DSLR and I’m scared to take it off Auto!

Your camera is simply a tool. It doesn’t have a life of its own, it just does what you tell it to do, and once you figure out a few simple things you will feel completely in control. There is nothing more freeing than flicking that little switch off Auto and onto Manual!


Image courtesy of Lawson Photography

Firstly, all cameras are different and it’s important to actually read the instruction booklet! You’ll come up against some stuff you won’t understand – google it. There’s nothing difficult about knowing what settings to use.

The three main things:

ISO – This is how sensitive to light your camera is. A lower setting is like sunscreen – protecting those precious pixels from ‘burning out’. When a pixel ‘burns out’ you get a white image (don’t worry – it’s not permanent!). If you’re outside and it’s sunny then go for a low number like ISO100 or 200. If you’re inside you might need to choose one of the higher ISOs that your camera allows like ISO1600. The higher your ISO the more grainy the picture will be (which is why you always get a bit of grain when it’s dark).

Shutter Speed – This is how long the sensor in your camera is exposed to light. If a shutter is open too long the picture will be too bright, and if it’s not open for long enough it will be too dark. If your picture is too blurry you’re probably using too slow a shutter speed.


Image courtesy of Lawson Photography

Aperture (or ‘f stop’) – This is the size of the opening in the lens, which controls how much light is coming in. A large aperture like f1.8 lets in lots of light, whereas a small aperture like f16 lets in very little light. It can seem confusing because a LARGE aperture is a SMALL number – but basically the lower the number, the better your camera will deal with low light (and as an added bonus, the more awesome and blurry your backgrounds will be!).

When you put your camera on Auto you are giving away the chance to get brilliant pictures. Your camera doesn’t know what you want a picture to look like! A good stepping stone to setting everything yourself on Manual is using Aperture Priority (or AV mode). This basically means you decide what aperture you would like, and what ISO you would like, and your camera will guess the shutter speed itself.


Image courtesy of Lawson Photography

Laura, can’t you just tell me a couple of settings which will probably work?!

  • Inside, with some windows so it’s not exactly dark: Put it on AV mode. ISO1600, f1.8 (or the lowest number your lens will allow).
  • Outside: ISO100 (or 200 if it’s cloudy), f1.8 (or the lowest number your lens will allow)

If your picture is kinda blurry it means the shutter speed your camera chose was a bit too low, put your ISO up a bit.

WHAT LENS SHOULD I BUY?

The lens you use is so important, and getting your hands on a good one can take your photos to the next level. Personally I am a massive fan of prime lenses as opposed to zoom lenses. A prime lens is a fixed distance, so you have to get used to moving your feet rather than standing still and zooming in and out! The benefit of a prime lens is that they have large apertures, and your images will have shallow depth of field. As professional photographers, we go for the top of the line £1000 lenses, but there are actually some great bargains out there which will make a big difference to your pictures and aren’t crazy expensive!

A 50mm lens is a great start and these f1.8 beauties are a bargain at around £100!

I JUST WANT A CAMERA I CAN CARRY AROUND WHICH TAKES NICE PICTURES!
The biggest thing to keep your eye out for is a camera with a big sensor; an increased sensor size gives you better performance in low light, more depth of field (pretty fuzzy backgrounds!) and generally better image quality. The great thing is there are lots of great cameras out there that fit this ‘handbag friendly and much better than your iphone’ category.


Image courtesy of Lawson Photography

£700 BUDGET

£450 BUDGET


Image courtesy of Lawson Photography

Pro Tips…

Ok so you’ve got the camera and you’ve had a play with the settings. Here are some general tips for pretty picture taking:

1. Position yourself so the sun (or main light source) is BEHIND the person/thing you’re shooting. Although it may seem natural to have the sun shining on your subject, this kind of light is actually really harsh and nasty – it will give you bags under the eyes and no one wants that! By back lighting your subject you get a lovely flattering rim light and creamy skin. Even better – if you can choose a spot where a bit of light is bouncing back onto them (i.e. the sun is behind the person and a white wall is behind you – they’ll be lit by the light bouncing of the wall). You’ll have to shoot on Manual mode and have a play with your settings so your subject is exposed correctly and doesn’t appear too dark (slow your shutter speed down a bit if they’re too dark and speed it up if it’s all a bit bright!)


Image courtesy of Lawson Photography

2. When shooting products try to choose a background with complimentary colours. A popular look in magazine product shots is using a shallow depth of field; to emulate this get as close to the item as your camera will allow and use the biggest aperture you can like f1.8. Textures look great when they’re fuzzy in the background, so have a play using floorboards, patterned sheets, old doors etc.

3. Organise your pictures so you can find them easily! We organise our folders by date, so for example: ’2012_03_09 Tea Party’.

4. Print the pictures you love. There really is nothing like flicking through an album, it beats scrolling through images on your computer any day! I love Blurb books for personal stuff, they’re a total bargain.

Happy snapping!

I’d love to hear if you are a camera enthusiast and have any tips on the right (compact-ish) camera or like me are learning the ropes and frustrated with set backs… Laura will be reading and available to answer any questions you have for her, and Pro togs, feel free to pitch in too! :)

Love,
Rebecca
xo