Blueberry Hummingbird Cake

April is my birthday month and so I feel inclined towards celebrating cake in all of it’s forms today. This one is a favourite recipe of mine from the first Hummingbird Bakery Cookbook and a slice even features on the cover. The reason that I like it is that it is huge – this is the perfect cake to have for a party or to take to work as it will easily feed 20. It’s light and moist and delicious. A total winner and it’s easy to make to boot.


Images copyright Lawson Photography

As you can see the images here were taken during the shoot at my old house before we moved, by the lovely Pete and Laura Lawson – thanks guys!

Blueberry cake – Adapted from the Hummingbird Bakery Cookbook
Preheat oven to 170C fan

350g butter, unsalted, room temp
350g caster sugar
6 eggs
1tsp vanilla extract
1 lemon zested
450g plain flour
2 tbsp of baking powder plus 1tsp
270ml soured cream

250g blueberries plus extra to decorate
1 quanitity of cream cheese frosting
(300g icing sugar, 50g unsalted butter, 125g cream cheese)
loosened with 30ml of soured cream and 20ml of lemon juice

25cm ring mould, greased and lined


Images copyright Lawson Photography

1. Cream butter and sugar until light and fluffy
2.Add eggs, one at a time
3.Beat in vanilla, lemon zest, flour and baking powder
4.Add soured cream and beat until combined, gently stir in blueberries
5.Fill your tin and smooth surface over with a knife
6.Bake for 40-50 mins until the crust is golden brown and the sponge springs back.


Images copyright Lawson Photography

7.Leave to cool in the mould for 5 minutes, then turn out onto a wired rack, removing the paper.
8.When the cake is cool, pour the icing mix over the top and sprinkle with blueberries.


Images copyright Lawson Photography

Definitely give it a try readers, it is soooo good!

Love,
Rebecca
xo

PS Thanks for bearing with me this week – we are back in the bedroom!!! I’m still getting sorted but hope to be back next week with my usual schedule.

Friday Food: Hummingbird Salted Caramel Chocolate Cake

Readers, if you are easily offended by images of oozing caramel, stiff chocolate ganache and crumbly moist chocolate cake, then look away now.

This post is basically food porn. 😉

So, one of the best things about birthdays is surely the cake, right? And in my family it has become somewhat of a tradition to make extravagant celebration cakes for any occasion going. When I say family, I really mean, Pete and I’s little family, but my sister happens to also be a baking obsessive and it was she who bestowed on me this tower of chocolate and caramel culinary pleasure.

I’ve asked Francesca to write it up herself as this was not a cake without trauma, you’ll notice the cake is not, ahem, perfect visually, (although could anything be more perfect than that caramel ooze as it crumbles slightly?) but let me tell you, it was melt in the mouth good. It was certainly a tricky one to make but I can now from experience tell you that if you want to make someone feel loved because of the sheer effort you put into something, this is the cake for you. Over to Francesca…

Hummingbird Salted Caramel Chocolate Cake (taken from The Hummingbird Bakery Cake Days by Tarek Malouf)
Serves: 12 (Actually serves 16 comfortably as it’s so rich)
Preparation time: 15 minutes
Cooking time: 50 minutes

For the sponge:
300g unsalted butter, softened
300g caster sugar
140g soft light brown sugar
3 eggs
100g cocoa powder
160ml buttermilk
1 tsp vanilla essence
330g (11½oz) plain flour
2 tsp baking powder
1 tsp bicarbonate of soda
½ tsp salt

For the salty caramel:
200g caster sugar
2 tbsp golden syrup
120ml double cream
60ml soured cream
1 tsp fine sea salt
For the frosting:
200g caster sugar
2 tbsp golden syrup
360 ml double cream
450g dark chocolate (minimum 70% cocoa solids), chopped, plus extra to decorate
450g unsalted butter, softened
Sea salt flakes, for sprinkling

Method
1. First make the salty caramel. In a small saucepan bring the sugar and golden syrup to the boil with 60ml (2fl oz) of water, allowing the mixture to boil for about 10 minutes, during which time it should become quite syrupy and a rich caramel colour.
2. Put the double cream, soured cream and salt in a separate pan and bring to the boil, then remove from the heat. The salt should completely dissolve in the cream.
3. When the sugar syrup is ready, remove it from the heat and carefully add the hot cream. It will bubble up as you pour in the cream, but smooth out again quickly after that, becoming a creamier golden colour. Pour the caramel into a small bowl and set it aside to cool while you make the frosting.
4. In a small, clean saucepan, bring the caster sugar and golden syrup to the boil with 60 millilitres of water, again letting this boil for approximately 10 minutes or until it is syrupy and caramel-coloured.
5. In a separate pan, bring the double cream to the boil. Carefully pour the hot cream into the caramel: as before, it will bubble up, but settle again shortly afterwards. Set this caramel aside to cool slightly.
6. Once it has cooled, add the chopped chocolate, stirring constantly while the chocolate melts. Using a hand-held electric whisk, mix the frosting for about 10 minutes or until the bottom of the bowl feels cool.
7. Add the butter to the chocolate caramel frosting and whisk together until the mixture is light and looks slightly whipped. Place the frosting in the fridge to cool and set for 40–50 minutes while you make the sponge.
8. Preheat the oven to 170°C/gas mark 3, and line the bases of the sandwich tins with baking parchment.
9. Using a freestanding electric mixer with the paddle attachment, or a hand-held electric whisk, cream together the butter and both types of sugars until light and fluffy. Add the eggs one at a time, mixing well after each addition and scraping down the sides of the bowl.
10. In a jug stir together the cocoa powder, buttermilk and vanilla essence with 60 millitres of water to form a thick paste. Sift together the remaining sponge ingredients, then add these in stages to the creamed butter and sugar, alternating with the cocoa powder paste and mixing thoroughly on a low-to-medium speed until all the ingredients are incorporated.
11. Divide the batter between the three prepared cake tins and bake for approximately 25 minutes or until the top of each sponge feels springy to the touch. Allow the sponges to cool slightly in their tins before turning out on to a wire rack and cooling completely before assembling.
12. Once the sponges feel cold to the touch, place one on a plate or cake card and top with approximately two tablespoons of the salty caramel, smoothing it over the sponge using a palette knife. Top the caramel layer with three to four tablespoons of the frosting and smooth it out as before.
13. Continue this process, sandwiching together the other two sponges with the remaining salty caramel and a layer of frosting and leaving enough frosting to cover the sides and top of the cake. To finish, decorate the top with chopped chocolate and a light sprinkling of the sea salt flakes.

After recently tasting Hotel Chocolate’s salted caramel chocolates I couldn’t resist making this cake as a birthday treat for Rebecca. I’ll warn you immediately it should come with a health warning for the vast quantities of terribly bad, (but delicious) ingredients! I’ll also admit it isn’t a particularly straightforward cake to bake, so clear a morning/afternoon to dedicate yourself to the task! I can however fully vouch for the end result being completely worth the effort!

I started by making the caramel which went without a hitch for the first batch. The second batch I took my eye off for what seemed like a second and I was suddenly surrounded by smoke and a billowing pan of black liquid!
Therefore top tip number one – watch your caramel very carefully! Let it boil gently at a medium heat and be patient.

I found I needed rather a large bowl for mixing the caramel, chocolate and butter to make the frosting – the bigger the better as you’ll end up with a whopping 1.5 litres of it! I think you could afford to make two thirds of the quantitiy and there’d still be plenty. I did have fun with the left over caramel and chocolate frosting though – The frosting sets to a truffle-like consistenty when left in the fridge for a few hours, so I pinched out cherry sized balls from the mix, rolled it into small balls and drizzled the left over reheated caramel over the top to make very simple truffles. Yum!

Although I love dark chocolate, If I made this cake again, I think I would substitue some of the dark chocolate for milk – maybe 300g dark to 150g milk (I like using galaxy in baking) just to make it a bit lighter. But that is entirely personal preference!

The cake mix is the most straightforward part of the cake and of all the mixes I’ve had the perk of licking out of the bowl, this was the best! The cake does come out quite crumbly though so I would use baking parchment and be careful taking it out of the tin in order to keep it in one piece.

Finally, by reheating the chocolate frosting in the microwave for 30 seconds before assembling the cake, it makes the frosting smooth on far more easily when you do the egdes and top.
Good luck and I guarantee you’ll enjoy the end product!

I think I need a lie down… feel free to leave inappropriate comments about the awesomeness that is this cake. I won’t judge you.

Love,
Rebecca
xo

Friday Food: DIY Ombre cake

So, since leaving the world of wedding blogging, I don’t have much occasion to delve into the wealth of pretty found on wedding blogs. I do however love my Pinterest account and find so much inspiration there. When there isn’t a wedding to plan I’m often found busy figuring out how to work something I’ve found there into my life instead.


Birthday sprinkles cake // Pink ombre cake with flags // Purple Ombre cake // Pink Ombre slice

Today’s Friday Food is an ombre cake, something I fell in love with and found via wedding pins but think works just as well as a celebration cake. I made this one to take to my work the day after my birthday to celebrate with them and thought I’d share some tips. There are a wealth of how to’s on various sites (See the list at the end of ones I read,) but really all you need is a dense-ish victoria sponge recipe and frosting. This is my own go-to Victoria sponge recipe (one of Florence’s actually!) if you need one.

For the sponge cake:8oz Self raising Flour
8oz Caster sugar
8oz butter (I usually use somewhere between this amount and half, depending how virtuous I’m feeling, it works just as well)
4 eggs
a splash of milk
and your chosen food colouring!

Buttercream Frosting:1/3 of a pack of unsalted butter
250-300g of icing sugar, according to taste.
a splash of milk

Method:There are 2 ways to mix a sponge, the easy way and the traditional way. If you have a food mixer there is nothing wrong with throwing everything into a bowl and whizzing it up. I’ve done this on many an occassion and it’s worked perfectly, save for the odd air bubble!.
If you want to do it properly, here’s how…
Add the butter and sugar together in a food mixer and ‘cream them’ until the sugar/butter mix is light pale and fluffy.
Next add in your (beaten) eggs and incorporate.
Lastly sift the flour in and mix together gently with your food mixer on a slow speed. Add a splash of milk to loosen the mixture if it’s too stiff, it should pour, but very slowly!
Now divide the mix into 4 equal portions. Keep one aside for the palest layer then add food colouring to the remaining three, to create a slightly more intense colour in each. I wanted mine pale so went easy on the colouring, but the strength of colour is up to you. Just go slowly, a little food colouring goes a long way!
Place each colour mixture into a separate 20cm cake tin and bake at 180 degrees for 15-20 minutes or until golden on top. To test if they are ready, insert a skewer and ensure it comes out clean. Cool on a wire rack.

While your cakes are cooling, mix your frosting. Start with the butter in cubes, at room temperature and mix it (in your food mixer again) to become smooth. Add the icing sugar bit by bt and try not to make an icing cloud int he kitchen – you may want to add it by hand to avoid this then use the food mixer later on to whizz it up into a lighter frosting. Add a splash of milk to loosen it as required.

Assembly:Sandwich each layer together with a dollop of frosting, spread out to a couple of millimetres thickness. If your cakes are particularly ‘dome shaped’ on top you might want to slice them off to make them flatter and stack better.
Next use your remaining frosting to ice the sides of the cake using a palete knife to press it into the cake as you spread in one motion. Pay particular attention to filling in the gaps between each layer at the edges.
Finsh with the top! Don’t worry about having enough frosting, there is plenty here, but if you are concerned just apply a thinner layer and continue to build up evenly.
Decorate your cake as you see fit, I used simple sprinkles for a party finish!

Next step? Enjoy!

Feel free to shoot me any questions you have in the comments box, I’ll help if I can!

Love,
Rebecca
xo

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